Tourism

Fire Dance, Turkey: In Pictures

I came across these fire dancers in Fethiye, Turkey. Walking home from dinner late one evening, we stopped to watch their performance. It was mesmerising to see as they moved with grace and precision, gently lit by the soft light of the flames in the darkness.
   

Playing with Fire

A little bit more about Poi…

A regular favourite of fire twirlers. Poi is a Maori word and the art of spinning poi originally comes from New Zealand, though it can be found throughout the world today.

1013187_10151727088871023_387112063_n

A fire poi is an arm-length chain with a handle attached to one end, and bundle of wicking material on the other. The wick is soaked in fuel, set on fire, and then spun with beautiful dramatic effect. Usually twirled in pairs, they create a beautiful circular fire trail about the fire dancer…

995913_10151727088896023_1816124294_n
 
If you’d like to read and see more about this region of Turkey, check out my other post Fethiye: Escape to the Old Town
Advertisements

Fethiye: Escape to the Old Town

It was a last minute, spur of the moment holiday to Turkey, a bargain package deal so I was expecting to end up somewhere really touristy and just spending my days lazing on the beach and eating lots of delicious local food, which I did do in good measure. But at heart I’m not really that much of a beach lounger and after a day or two I start to fidget and the need to explore takes over. So I headed out from our beach resort near Fethiye, in the well-known tourist region of Dalaman, with the famous resort of Oludeniz just down the road, and took a short ride by dolmus (shared taxi or minibus) to explore the Old Town.

2013-07-02 12.40.25-1  2013-07-06 13.31.00

A great place to relax and watch the world go by sipping a strong turkish coffee or a deliciously fresh juice in a small cafe… Stroll along the harbour, haggle in the markets looking for bargains… Take a slow walk around the old town, with its little cobbled streets, traditional buildings and white-washed mosques.

969494_10151727075481023_2077788505_n

And don’t forget to visit the Fish Market (on Tuesdays), you can buy a fish of your choice from the middle of the Market and then get it filleted and cooked to your liking by any of the surrounding cafes. As we visited early in the holiday season in mid June, the locals welcomed us eagerly and I noticed at this time of year the majority of the tourists were Turkish and Lebanese holidaymakers.

A mix of the traditional and the touristy, but that’s fairly normal all over the world nowadays, there are some great finds here.

And a great place to just walk around with my camera, so here it is in pictures…